Tag Archives: Fiction

Librarians Recommend: A Man Called Ove

Dawn Recommends: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

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Written by Fredrik Backman and translated by Henning Koch

A grumpy yet loveable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door.

I absolutely loved this book and how we got to follow this old, curmudgeon of a man who just made you wonder why anyone would put up with him, from completely unlikeable to someone you could understand and even sympathize with. It was such a lovely read.

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New Books!

Rise & Shine Benedict Stone by Phaedra Patrick

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Moonstone for empathy. Azurite for memories. Lapis lazuli for truth… In the quiet village of Noon Sun, Benedict Stone has settled into a complacent and predictable routine. Business at his jewelry shop has dried up; his marriage is on the rocks. His life is in desperate need of a jump start…

And then a surprise arrives at his door.

Novels about love and second chances abound right now, but Patrick’s follow-up to her debut, The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper, rises to the top with its clever plot, utterly charming characters, and warmly believable conclusion. 

 

A House Among the Tress by Julia Glass

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Is it possible for an author to be too generous to her characters?

When the revered children’s author Mort Lear dies accidentally at the Connecticut home he shares with Tomasina Daulair, his trusted assistant, she is stunned to be left the house and all its contents, as well as being named his literary executor. Overwhelmed by the responsibility for Lear’s bequest, she must face the demands of all those affected by the sudden loss of this man they all loved.

 

 

 

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The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

The engine of Roy’s story is a hijra (India’s third gender) named Anjum, and the story begins with her unrolling a threadbare Persian carpet in a city graveyard she calls home. Anjum’s charisma draws a vibrant assemblage of outcasts to join her–other hijras, Kashmiri freedom fighters, activists, orphans, low-caste Hindus and Muslims, and a host of animals. Anjum’s home is a place where the formerly unwanted embrace each other’s true selves.

As this ravishing, deeply humane novel braids these lives together, it reinvents what a novel can do and can be. The Ministry of Utmost Happiness demonstrates on every page Arundhati Roy’s storytelling gifts.

The Ministry of Utmost Happiness is a novel of maddeningly frayed edges, wonky pacing and occasional longueurs. But its patchwork of narratives, painful, funny, sexy, violent, earthy, otherworldly, its recurring images of lost and recovered children, individual sacrifice and self-denial, and its depiction of the constant battle toward self-assertion in a society still held in thrall to the taxonomy of caste and class, make for a disturbing and memorable return to the land of make-believe.

 

 

 

 

 

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New Books In!

Ladies and gents, new books have arrived!

c5d19c013a5014e5cdac3d127b4d9c29.jpgDesperation Road by Michael Farris Smith

For eleven years the clock has been ticking for Russell Gaines as he sits in Parchman penitentiary. His sentence now up, Russell believes his debt has been paid. But when he returns home, he discovers that revenge lives and breathes all around him.

This is what the internet has to say about it:

Smith writes shapely prose and sharp dialogue and everywhere displays an acute sense of the moments and pain that can define lives in a small town.

 

 

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The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir by Jennifer Ryan

As England enters World War II’s dark early days, spirited music professor Primrose Trent, recently arrived to the village of Chilbury, emboldens the women of the town to defy the Vicar’s stuffy edict to shutter the church’s choir in the absence of men and instead ‘carry on singing’. Resurrecting themselves as “The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir”, the women of this small village soon use their joint song to lift up themselves, and the community, as the war tears through their lives. 

Despite its pastoral title, Jennifer Ryan’s compelling and exquisitely wrought World War II-era novel is far removed from the stereotypical cozy British village story. 

If you like the story, there’s even a ready-made book club kit full of fun facts, discussion questions, and even a recipe inspired by the story.

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The Force by Don Winslow

All Denny Malone wants is to be a good cop.

He is “the King of Manhattan North,” a highly decorated NYPD detective sergeant and the real leader of “Da Force.” Malone and his crew are the smartest, the toughest, the quickest, the bravest, and the baddest elite special unit there is.

What only a few know is that Denny Malone is dirty. Now Malone is caught in a trap and being squeezed by the Feds, and he must walk the thin line between betraying his brothers and partners, the Job, his family, and the woman he loves, all while trying to survive, as his city teeters on the brink of a racial conflagration that could destroy them all.

Don Winslow’s summer blockbuster, ‘The Force,’ is ready-made for Hollywood

 

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YA Spotlight: LGBT Gems

Contrary to popular belief, LGBT characters do more than come out to their families and forge forbidden relationships. Don’t believe me? Try one of these books from our YA collection.

George by Alex Gino

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Be who you are.

When people look at George, they think they see a boy. But she knows she’s not a boy. She’s a girl.

George thinks she’ll have to keep this a secret forever. Then her teacher announces that their class play is going to be Charlotte’s Web. George really, really, REALLY wants to play Charlotte. But the teacher says she can’t even try out for the part…because she’s a boy.

With the help of her best friend, Kelly, George comes up with a plan.

 

 

every day by david levithan

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Every day a different body. Every day a different life.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

 

Six of Crows / Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugoc5d19c013a5014e5cdac3d127b4d9c29.jpg

No mourners. No funerals. Among them, it passed for ‘good luck.’

Criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker has been offered wealth beyond his wildest dreams. But to claim it, he’ll have to pull off a seemingly impossible heist. Kaz needs a crew desperate enough to take on this suicide mission and dangerous enough to get the job done – and he knows exactly who: six of the deadliest outcasts the city has to offer. Together, they just might be unstoppable – if they don’t kill each other first.

(Two book duology – both in our collection.)

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Page to Screen 3

M.L. Steadman’s The Light Between Oceans

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Tom Sherbourne takes a job as the lighthouse keeper on Janus Rock, nearly half a day’s journey from the coast. To this isolated island, where the supply boat comes once a season and shore leaves are granted every other year at best, Tom brings a young, bold, and loving wife, Isabel. Years later, after two miscarriages and one stillbirth, the grieving Isabel hears a baby’s cries on the wind. A boat has washed up onshore carrying a dead man and a living baby.

Michael Punke’s The Revenant 

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A thrilling tale of betrayal and revenge set against the nineteenth-century American frontier, the astonishing story of real-life trapper and frontiersman Hugh Glass.

Louis Sachar’s Holes

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Stanley Yelnats is under a curse. A curse that began with his no-good-dirty-rotten-pig-stealing-great-great-grandfather and has since followed generations of Yelnatses. Now Stanley has been unjustly sent to a boys’ detention center, Camp Green Lake, where the boys build character by spending all day, every day digging holes exactly five feet wide and five feet deep. There is no lake at Camp Green Lake. But there are an awful lot of holes.

It doesn’t take long for Stanley to realize there’s more than character improvement going on at Camp Green Lake. The boys are digging holes because the warden is looking for something. But what could be buried under a dried-up lake?

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Laine Moriarty’s Big Little Lies

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Big Little Lies is a brilliant take on ex-husbands and second wives, mothers and daughters, schoolyard scandal, and the dangerous little lies we tell ourselves just to survive.

Dennis Lehane’s Live by Night

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Joe Coughlin, the youngest son of a prominent Boston police captain, has long since turned his back on his strict and proper upbringing. Now having graduated from a childhood of petty theft to a career in the pay of the city’s most fearsome mobsters, Joe enjoys the spoils, thrills, and notoriety of being an outlaw.

But life on the dark side carries a heavy price. In a time when ruthless men of ambition, armed with cash, illegal booze, and guns, battle for control, no one–neither family nor friend, enemy nor lover–can be trusted. Beyond money and power, even the threat of prison, one fate seems most likely for men like Joe: an early death. But until that day, he and his friends are determined to live life to the hilt.

Fredrik Backman’s A Man Called Ove

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A grumpy yet loveable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door.

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