Tag Archives: YA

Audiobook Recommendations

Narrators either make or break an audiobook. If you’ve only ever had bad luck with audio, try some of these readers to get you out of that rut:

Robin Miles
Listening to Miles is like listening to a full cast recording – every character has a different accent, a different tone of voice. Her reading is so rich that it can be hard to turn her audiobooks off.

Some of the books she narrates:

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Will Patton
Not every guy can read female characters in a way that sounds realistic, but Patton can definitely pull it off, even for characters singing nonsense songs. He’s got a surprisingly varied catalog of works, too, so there’s something for anyone trying to get into the genre.

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Jim Dale
The man best known for bringing the Harry Potter books to audio, Jim Dale is one of the titans of YA audiobooks. While he might not be as versitile as the above readers, he has a lovely voice, and his style feels very much like story hour at your local library or school If you’re a YA addict, or are just looking for some lighter, more action-packed books to add to your day, give his work a try.

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All of the books listed are available through the Green Mountain Library Consortium. Each book cover above is linked to its download page.  Just sign in under the Russell Memorial Library with your FULL card number to borrow the audiobooks, (if they haven’t already been checked out by someone else):

Russell Library Number: XXX
FULL Library Card Number (for use online): 2v6td000000XXX

For more details on why you have two different library card numbers, see our Audio and E-Books tab.

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Page to Screen

Wonder by R.J. Palacio

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August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school—until now. He’s about to start 5th grade at Beecher Prep, and if you’ve ever been the new kid then you know how hard that can be. The thing is Auggie’s just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, despite appearances?

In Theatres: November 17th

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

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Why yes, that is Oprah on the cover.

Henrietta Lacks, as HeLa, is known to present-day scientists for her cells from cervical cancer. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells were taken without her knowledge and still live decades after her death.

This is the story of her, her family, and the cells that changed modern medicine as we know it.

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

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When sober, Jeannette’s brilliant and charismatic father captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and how to embrace life fearlessly. But when he drank, he was dishonest and destructive.

The Walls children learned to take care of themselves. They fed, clothed, and protected one another, and eventually found their way to New York. Their parents followed them, choosing to be homeless even as their children prospered.

This is their story.

In theaters: Now!

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Genre Feature: Verse Novels

Did you know that there are entire novels written in poetic verse? Like so many poems, they tend read quick but carry quite the emotional punch.

Full Cicada Moon by Marilyn Hilton

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“So, I have to know,” he says, “what are you?”
But just because he has to know doesn’t mean I have to tell him anything.

It’s 1969, and the Apollo 11 mission is getting ready to go to the moon. But for half-black, half-Japanese Mimi, moving to a predominantly white Vermont town is enough to make her feel alien. And even though teachers and neighbors balk at her mixed-race family and her refusals to conform, Mimi’s dreams of becoming an astronaut never fade—no matter how many times she’s told no.

Written by a Middlebury College Alumn!

 

 

Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse

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And I know now that all the time I was trying to get
out of the dust,
the fact is,
what I am,
I am because of the dust.
And what I am is good enough.
Even for me.

Billie Jo is just a fourteen year old farm girl trying to survive unspeakable loss while living in the dust bowl during the Great Depression.

Hesse currently lives in Vermont!

 

 

 

brown girl dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

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Even the silence 
has a story to tell you. 
Just listen. Listen.

Growing up both in her Grandparents’ South Carolina and her mother’s New York City, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. This is the true story of how she grew up in limbo between the two places, and how she discovered she wanted to be a writer no matter how hard it was for her to read.

 

 

 

 

Love that Dog / Hate that Cat by Sharon Creech

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Sometimes
when you are trying 
not to think about something
it keeps popping back in your head
you can’t help it
you think about it
and 
think about it
and 
think about it
until your brain
feels like
a squashed pea.

Jack hates poetry. Only girls write it and every time he tries to, his brain feels empty. But his teacher, Ms. Stretchberry, won’t stop giving her class poetry assignments — and Jack can’t avoid them. But then something amazing happens. The more he writes, the more he learns he does have something to say.

Especially about the dog he loves that isn’t with him anymore. And that stupid cat his parents got him afterwards.

Make Lemonade by Virginia Euwer Wolff

movie.jpgYou ever laughed so hard
nobody in the world could hurt you for a minute,
no matter what they tried to do to you? 

Fourteen-year-old LaVaughn is determined to go to college–she just needs the money to get there.

When she answers a babysitting ad, LaVaughn meets Jolly, a seventeen-year-old single mother with two kids by different fathers. As she helps Jolly make lemonade out of the lemons her life has given her, LaVaughn learns some lessons outside the classroom.

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Review Round Up – Six of Crows

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Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

Six dangerous outcasts. One impossible heist. Kaz’s crew is the only thing that might stand between the world and destruction—if they don’t kill each other first.

Watch the book trailer here.

#1 New York Times Bestseller
USA Today Bestseller
New York Times Notable Book of 2015

Yeah, we’re a little late to the party on this one, but it’s in the library now, and one of our librarians will not stop pushing it everyone’s faces. Is it really as good as she claims, though?

NPR praises the skill with which Bardugo crafts her heist, expounding upon her cleverly handled characters and impressive world building, but comments that her characters seem a bit too mature for their 17 years, with one of them sounding more like a 50-year-old hardened criminal than a teenager.

Disability in Kidlit praises depictions of PTSD and physical disability in the book, while noting the lack of time spent with the queer characters and queer romances in comparison to their straight counterparts.

In her BookTube review, gingerreadslainey praises how well-rounded the book is, giving the character and world and plot equal weight and development, and drawing on real world research extensively to craft a world so real that it made her want to jump in and join it.

Entertainment Weekly generally enjoyed the page-turning qualities of the story, but struggled to get through the first chapter of exposition and into the story itself.

What do you think? Ready to grab our copy of this book (and its sequel) and give it a go? Think it sounds too low-brow for you? Tell us in the comments below.

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Librarians Recommend

Katie recommends Sabriel by Garth Nix

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Does the walker choose the path, or the path the walker?

Sent to a boarding school in Ancelstierre as a young child, Sabriel has had little experience with the power of Free Magic or the Dead who refuse to stay dead in the Old Kingdom. But during her final semester, her father, the Abhorsen, goes missing, and Sabriel knows she must enter the Old Kingdom to find him.

The description sounds gothic and scary, but really Sabriel reads like a cousin to the Narnia books, complete with talking cats, lost princes, and magical bells. Don’t let the talk of death scare you off–this feminist tale sells every bit of its carefully crafted world, from British boarding school to mystical showdown with the forces of darkness.

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YA Spotlight: LGBT Gems

Contrary to popular belief, LGBT characters do more than come out to their families and forge forbidden relationships. Don’t believe me? Try one of these books from our YA collection.

George by Alex Gino

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Be who you are.

When people look at George, they think they see a boy. But she knows she’s not a boy. She’s a girl.

George thinks she’ll have to keep this a secret forever. Then her teacher announces that their class play is going to be Charlotte’s Web. George really, really, REALLY wants to play Charlotte. But the teacher says she can’t even try out for the part…because she’s a boy.

With the help of her best friend, Kelly, George comes up with a plan.

 

 

every day by david levithan

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Every day a different body. Every day a different life.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

 

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No mourners. No funerals. Among them, it passed for ‘good luck.’

Criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker has been offered wealth beyond his wildest dreams. But to claim it, he’ll have to pull off a seemingly impossible heist. Kaz needs a crew desperate enough to take on this suicide mission and dangerous enough to get the job done – and he knows exactly who: six of the deadliest outcasts the city has to offer. Together, they just might be unstoppable – if they don’t kill each other first.

(Two book duology – both in our collection.)

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Page to Screen 4

Did you know these kids books had movies? Or that the movies were based on books?

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh by Robert O’Brien

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Mrs. Frisby, a widowed mouse with four small children, must move her family to their summer quarters immediately, or face almost certain death. But her youngest son, Timothy, lies ill with pneumonia and must not be moved. Fortunately, she encounters the rats of NIMH, an extraordinary breed of highly intelligent creatures, who come up with a brilliant solution to her dilemma.

The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo

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A brave mouse, a covetous rat, a wishful serving girl embark on a journey that will lead them down into a horrible dungeon, up into a glittering castle, and, ultimately, into each other’s lives.

Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg

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The game under the tree looked like a hundred others Peters and Judy had at home. But they were bored and restless and, looking for something interesting to do, thought they’d give Jumanji a try. Little did they know when they unfolded its ordinary-looking playing board that they were about to be plunged into the most exciting and bizzare adventure of their lives.

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