Tag Archives: YA

Review Round Up – Six of Crows

c5d19c013a5014e5cdac3d127b4d9c29.jpg

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

Six dangerous outcasts. One impossible heist. Kaz’s crew is the only thing that might stand between the world and destruction—if they don’t kill each other first.

Watch the book trailer here.

#1 New York Times Bestseller
USA Today Bestseller
New York Times Notable Book of 2015

Yeah, we’re a little late to the party on this one, but it’s in the library now, and one of our librarians will not stop pushing it everyone’s faces. Is it really as good as she claims, though?

NPR praises the skill with which Bardugo crafts her heist, expounding upon her cleverly handled characters and impressive world building, but comments that her characters seem a bit too mature for their 17 years, with one of them sounding more like a 50-year-old hardened criminal than a teenager.

Disability in Kidlit praises depictions of PTSD and physical disability in the book, while noting the lack of time spent with the queer characters and queer romances in comparison to their straight counterparts.

In her BookTube review, gingerreadslainey praises how well-rounded the book is, giving the character and world and plot equal weight and development, and drawing on real world research extensively to craft a world so real that it made her want to jump in and join it.

Entertainment Weekly generally enjoyed the page-turning qualities of the story, but struggled to get through the first chapter of exposition and into the story itself.

What do you think? Ready to grab our copy of this book (and its sequel) and give it a go? Think it sounds too low-brow for you? Tell us in the comments below.

Leave a comment

Filed under Content

Librarians Recommend

Katie recommends Sabriel by Garth Nix

c5d19c013a5014e5cdac3d127b4d9c29.jpg

Does the walker choose the path, or the path the walker?

Sent to a boarding school in Ancelstierre as a young child, Sabriel has had little experience with the power of Free Magic or the Dead who refuse to stay dead in the Old Kingdom. But during her final semester, her father, the Abhorsen, goes missing, and Sabriel knows she must enter the Old Kingdom to find him.

The description sounds gothic and scary, but really Sabriel reads like a cousin to the Narnia books, complete with talking cats, lost princes, and magical bells. Don’t let the talk of death scare you off–this feminist tale sells every bit of its carefully crafted world, from British boarding school to mystical showdown with the forces of darkness.

Leave a comment

Filed under Content

YA Spotlight: LGBT Gems

Contrary to popular belief, LGBT characters do more than come out to their families and forge forbidden relationships. Don’t believe me? Try one of these books from our YA collection.

George by Alex Gino

movie.jpg

Be who you are.

When people look at George, they think they see a boy. But she knows she’s not a boy. She’s a girl.

George thinks she’ll have to keep this a secret forever. Then her teacher announces that their class play is going to be Charlotte’s Web. George really, really, REALLY wants to play Charlotte. But the teacher says she can’t even try out for the part…because she’s a boy.

With the help of her best friend, Kelly, George comes up with a plan.

 

 

every day by david levithan

book.jpg

Every day a different body. Every day a different life.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

 

Six of Crows / Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugoc5d19c013a5014e5cdac3d127b4d9c29.jpg

No mourners. No funerals. Among them, it passed for ‘good luck.’

Criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker has been offered wealth beyond his wildest dreams. But to claim it, he’ll have to pull off a seemingly impossible heist. Kaz needs a crew desperate enough to take on this suicide mission and dangerous enough to get the job done – and he knows exactly who: six of the deadliest outcasts the city has to offer. Together, they just might be unstoppable – if they don’t kill each other first.

(Two book duology – both in our collection.)

Leave a comment

Filed under Content

Page to Screen 4

Did you know these kids books had movies? Or that the movies were based on books?

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh by Robert O’Brien

book.jpgmovie.jpg

Mrs. Frisby, a widowed mouse with four small children, must move her family to their summer quarters immediately, or face almost certain death. But her youngest son, Timothy, lies ill with pneumonia and must not be moved. Fortunately, she encounters the rats of NIMH, an extraordinary breed of highly intelligent creatures, who come up with a brilliant solution to her dilemma.

The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo

book.jpgmovie.jpg

A brave mouse, a covetous rat, a wishful serving girl embark on a journey that will lead them down into a horrible dungeon, up into a glittering castle, and, ultimately, into each other’s lives.

Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg

book.jpgmovie.jpg

The game under the tree looked like a hundred others Peters and Judy had at home. But they were bored and restless and, looking for something interesting to do, thought they’d give Jumanji a try. Little did they know when they unfolded its ordinary-looking playing board that they were about to be plunged into the most exciting and bizzare adventure of their lives.

Leave a comment

Filed under Content

Genre Feature – Graphic Novels

Graphic Novels (aka Comic Books) are often decried as junk, and children are often encouraged to “make the jump” from comics to “real books.” However, scientists and teachers alike are starting to support the use of comics as a unique teaching tool that not only makes learning more enjoyable, but also helps readers understand concepts more clearly. J.A. Micheline outlines the merits of comics quite nicely at the Guardian.

But why take her word for it? Come try some of the new items from our Graphic collection.

c5d19c013a5014e5cdac3d127b4d9c29.jpgEl Deafo by Cece Bell

“Starting at a new school is scary, even more so with a giant hearing aid strapped to your chest! At her old school, everyone in Cece’s class was deaf. Here she is different. She is sure the kids are staring at the Phonic Ear, the powerful aid that will help her hear her teacher. Too bad it also seems certain to repel potential friends.”

An unforgettable book about growing up, and all the super and super embarrassing moments along the way.”

book.jpg

Tommysaurus REX by Doug TenNapel

“A tale about a boy and his T Rex! Ely is an everyboy trying to cope with the death of his dog Tommy. When he finds a live, 40-foot Tyrannosaurus Rex trapped in a cave behind his grandfather’s house, Ely embarks on an adventure to tame this seemingly friendly giant, convince the town his new pet isn’t a threat, and keep his dinosaur safe from the jealous town bully.”

movie.jpg

Compass South by Hope Larson and Rebecca Mock

When 12-year-old twins Alexander and Cleopatra’s father disappears, they set off on a across-country adventure full of mysteries, heists, and swashbuckling across 1860’s America.

Leave a comment

Filed under Content

Page to Screen 3

M.L. Steadman’s The Light Between Oceans

book.jpgmovie.jpg

Tom Sherbourne takes a job as the lighthouse keeper on Janus Rock, nearly half a day’s journey from the coast. To this isolated island, where the supply boat comes once a season and shore leaves are granted every other year at best, Tom brings a young, bold, and loving wife, Isabel. Years later, after two miscarriages and one stillbirth, the grieving Isabel hears a baby’s cries on the wind. A boat has washed up onshore carrying a dead man and a living baby.

Michael Punke’s The Revenant 

book.jpgmovie.jpg

A thrilling tale of betrayal and revenge set against the nineteenth-century American frontier, the astonishing story of real-life trapper and frontiersman Hugh Glass.

Louis Sachar’s Holes

book.jpgmovie.jpg

Stanley Yelnats is under a curse. A curse that began with his no-good-dirty-rotten-pig-stealing-great-great-grandfather and has since followed generations of Yelnatses. Now Stanley has been unjustly sent to a boys’ detention center, Camp Green Lake, where the boys build character by spending all day, every day digging holes exactly five feet wide and five feet deep. There is no lake at Camp Green Lake. But there are an awful lot of holes.

It doesn’t take long for Stanley to realize there’s more than character improvement going on at Camp Green Lake. The boys are digging holes because the warden is looking for something. But what could be buried under a dried-up lake?

Leave a comment

Filed under Content

Page to Screen

Looking for a new book to try? Consider these items from the collection that have recently been made into movies and TV series.

Lee Child’s Jack Reacher Series

657496795075443.jpgJack_Reacher_poster.jpg

After leaving the US Army as a major in its military police at age 36, Reacher roams the United States taking odd jobs and investigating suspicious and frequently dangerous situations.

Daisy Goodwin’s Victoria 

657496795075443.jpgJack_Reacher_poster.jpg

In 1837, less than a month after her eighteenth birthday, Alexandrina Victoria – sheltered, small in stature, and female – became Queen of Great Britain and Ireland. Many thought it was preposterous: Alexandrina — Drina to her family — had always been tightly controlled by her mother and her household, and was surely too unprepossessing to hold the throne. Yet from the moment William IV died, the young Queen startled everyone.

Ransom Riggs’ Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

657496795075443.jpgJack_Reacher_poster.jpg

A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of curious photographs. A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Content